An overview of rotary swaging

With rotary swaging, components are lightweight and manufactured precisely and efficiently. Rotary swaging also permits a higher degree of design freedom. This forming working process was developed more than 100 years ago, and still offers many benefits today.


In today's international automotive industry, cost-effective yet safe production has become very important. The rotary swaging process makes it possible to use a smaller amount of expensive materials as well as blank tubes instead of solid stainless steel. The forming itself provides components, such as front axles or steering shafts, with resilience and stability, which would be much more expensive to obtain if produced using cutting processes. At the same time, material can be saved and the component weight can be reduced, which is of particular interest for drive shafts and guide wheel shafts. This leads to fuel savings and reduced vehicle emissions - which is a fundamental goal for modern automotive engineering. In addition, rotary swaging, with the use of infeed swaging or mandrels, is suitable for producing a wide range of outer and inner geometries. This makes it possible to form a hose connection as well as carry out the highly precise and quick manufacturing of steering spindles, airbag cylinders or adjustment wheel drives. This provides maximum design freedom for visible and hidden parts and components.


Infeed swaging
Infeed swaging
Recess swaging
Recess swaging
Mandrel
Mandrel

The Basic Principle

Infeed swaging

In the infeed swaging process, the workpiece is fed into the rotary swaging unit in an axial direction. The dies are closed through a radial movement defined by a special cam geometry.

Result:

  • Long, reduced diameter starting at the end of the workpiece
  • Flat transition angles

Recess swaging

In the infeed swaging process, the workpiece is fed into the opened die and then also partially advanced during processing.

Combined method

By combining both processes, the middle of the component can be reduced which is not restricted by the length of the die.

Result:

  • Localized reduction on cross section (even in the middle of the workpiece)
  • Forming of steep transition angles

The following applies to both process variants: The use of additional mandrels means that complex and high-precision internal contours can be manufactured – all while the outside diameter is being machined at the same time.